Frequently Asked Questions

We understand that you might have many questions, but don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. We’ve tried to cover anything ADAS or Smart AVR related; however, if there is anything we’ve missed or you’re still unsure about, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

The Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) uses image processing cameras, radar, light detection and ranging, and other sensors to monitor vehicle surroundings and detect potentially dangerous situations.

 

The purpose is to increase safety through advanced situational awareness and reduce collision possibilities.

 

Sensors used in ADAS include cameras, radars, lasers, and ultrasound. They can detect light, heat, pressure, and other variables used to monitor the state of a vehicle. Usually, they are in the front and rear bumpers, side mirrors, vehicle cab, and wind shield glasses.

ADAS usually includes Traffic Message Channel (TMC), Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA), Vehicular Communication Systems and other driver assistance systems. The specific systems are as follows:

 

Vehicle Cab

1) Lane Departure Warning System

2) Lane Keeping Assist

3) Traffic Sign/Signal Recognition

4) Night Vision System

5) Driver Status Monitor

6) Electric Vehicle Warning

7) Hill Descent Control

 

Front

1) Parking Assist

2) Adaptive Front/Lighting System

3) Adaptive Cruise Control

4) Pedestrian Detection

5) Emergency Brake

 

Rear

1) Reverse Image

2) Parking Assist

3) Rear Collision Warning

 

Side

1) Surround View

2) Blind Spot Detection

Under normal circumstances, after repair in an accident, the relevant auxiliary systems must be calibrated. When disassembling or reinstalling monitoring components such as cameras, radars, and sensors, replacing the vehicle ECU, or the vehicle height has been changed, auxiliary and other systems need to be calibrated. For example, ACC calibration needs to be performed in the following cases.

 

  1. Repair or replace the Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) radar sensor control unit
  2. ACC radar sensor deviation angle out of normal range
  3. Adjust position of the ACC radar sensor on the vehicle body
  4. Repair or replace bumper or radiator grill
  5. Adjust chassis

The front-view camera captures what is in front of the vehicle. It is used in several ADAS systems, including Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Lane Keeping Assist (LKA) and Traffic Sign/Signal Recognition (TSR) systems, often in conjunction with other sensors, cameras or sensing systems to provide input data.

The 360° or Surround View Camera System uses multiple camera views to create one 360° top-down (bird’s eye) view surrounding the vehicle. This system is used in both passive (displayed instructions) and active (autonomous) vehicle parking assist systems.

ADAS radar sensors detect fixed and moving objects at different distances around the perimeter of a vehicle. Different Radar types and frequencies are used in various ADAS systems. Ultra-short-range radar (USRR) and short-range radar (SRR) provide data for blind spot detection (BSD) and lane-change assist (LCA), while systems including adaptive cruise control (ACC) use longer-range radar.

Cameras, sensors, ultrasound, radar, and LIDAR are some of the systems used to capture the driving environment data, including travelling or static vehicles position, pedestrian location, road sign, driving lane and intersection detection, road (curves), and driving conditions (poor visibility or evening driving), use that information to instruct the vehicle to take its predetermined action. Cameras, sensors and sensing systems are typically located in front and rear bumpers, windshield, front grill and side and rear-view mirrors.

ADAS calibration procedures should be performed on a level floor. If an alignment lift is used for levelling, the Autel calibration software can provide adjustment information, and the calibration frame can be easily raised or lowered to be level with the vehicle.

  1. Perform calibration procedures indoors without object obstructions.
  2. No exterior light sources to cast uneven surface shadows.
  3. Some procedures require bright background light alignments.
  4.  

Park the vehicle on a flat and level surface with its front wheels pointing straight and ensure there is room around the vehicle (generally, there should not be objects within three meters or ten feet of the front of the vehicle).

Sensor Replacement / Accident Repair / Wheel Alignment / Windshield Replacement / Diagnostic Service

 

During the Pre-SCAN procedure, the MaxiSys software will scan all modules in all systems, list them on a single screen, and then provide visual ADAS icons next to the active ADAS modules. This shows technicians which ADAS systems are active and helps prepare a more detailed repair plan which includes the required ADAS calibration procedures after the repairs are complete.

The technician can review the post-calibration scan to confirm if the module DTC is cleared. The ADAS module calibration will not complete if the calibration steps were not followed correctly.

Depending on vehicle type, either a Stationary or Dynamic calibration procedure is required (in some vehicle types, both are required) to calibrate ADAS sensors to vehicle modules.

 

  • Stationary calibrations are completed in a shop environment and require the use of targets or patterns to complete.
  • Dynamic calibrations require the vehicle to be driven on roadways for a certain amount of time with well-maintained road markings.
  • Flat and level surface with enough room around the vehicle to complete calibration procedures. (generally, there should not be objects within the 15 foot by 30 foot calibration area)
  • Perform calibration procedures indoors without object obstructions.
  • No exterior light sources to cast uneven surface shadows.
  • Some procedures require bright background light alignments.
  • The vehicle coolants and engine oil should be at recommended levels and the gas tank full.
  • The vehicle should not be carrying any load (passengers or cargo).
  • Adjust the tire pressure to the recommended value.
  • Attach the wireless VCI to the vehicle DLC.
  • Make sure the MaxiSys is paired to the VCI, then make sure to close all the vehicle doors.
  • Establish communication from the diagnostic tool to the vehicle.
  • Follow the MaxiSys ADAS software instructions to ensure accurate calibration. Preparation measures vary by vehicle and system.
  • Depending on vehicle type, either a Stationary or Dynamic calibration procedure is required (in some vehicle types, both are required) to calibrate ADAS sensors to vehicle modules.
  • Stationary calibrations are completed in a shop environment and require the use of targets or patterns to complete.
  • Dynamic calibrations require the vehicle to be driven on roadways for a certain amount of time with well-maintained road markings.
  •  

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