What are the different components of ADAS?

With the advent of ever-increasing advancements in new vehicle safety technology, Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS) is a new description for a collection of safe human-machine interfaces to aid the driver in maintaining car and road safety.

ADAS safety features are designed to avoid accidents and collisions by offering technologies that alert the driver to problems, implementing safeguards, and taking control of the vehicle if necessary. The vision of Smart AVR is to offer the complete solution to ensure all these systems are calibrated and maintained to maximum accuracy, thus ensuring the safety of all road users. ADAS systems are located in 3 main areas of the vehicle

1. Front of Car

The front of the vehicle is home to a number of ADAS features. These sensors can be used for more than one function and can be connected actively to the vehicle’s braking & steering, therefore making it essential that they are functioning perfectly. Front & side radar or laser scanners (LIDAR) are used for:

 

  • Automatic Emergency braking
  • Adaptive cruise control
  • Forward collision warning
  • Pedestrian protection
  • Cross traffic alert
Where the driver sits in the main cabin of the vehicle, it contains ADAS systems that directly aid in the safe operation of the vehicle.
 
Features inclusive of:

 

Lane keeping assist and lane departure warnings are managed by a camera attached to the windscreen in front of the driver. Visual & audio cues are displayed on the instrument panel or head up display for the driver to see without distracting the view of the road ahead. This system can use the vehicle’s brakes to control its alignment to the road ahead. Recalibrating the camera when a new windscreen is fitted is essential to maintain the accuracy of the system.
 
While some vehicles may not have a lane assist feature, the windscreen can feature a LIDAR, a laser range finder that aids in maintaining safe distances from other vehicles and is connected to the Autonomous Braking System for use in emergencies.
 
360 around view cameras are fitted around the vehicle, including both the side mirrors to display a picture of the vehicle and its surroundings on the multifunction display. This aids the driver in manoeuvring around objects and other vehicles safely.
 
Calibrations to the ADAS can be achieved only by an expert technician in a controlled environment using only approved procedures.

2. Middle of Car

Where the driver sits in the main cabin of the vehicle, it contains ADAS systems that directly aid in the safe operation of the vehicle.
 
Features inclusive of:
Lane keeping assist as well as lane departure warnings which are managed by a camera attached to the windscreen in front of the driver and visual & audio cues are displayed on the instrument panel or head up display for the driver to see without distracting the view of the road ahead. This system can use the vehicles brakes to control its alignment to the road ahead. Recalibrating the camera when a new windscreen is fitted is essential to maintain the accuracy of the system.
 
Whilst some vehicles may not have a lane assist feature the windscreen can feature a LIDAR which is a laser range finder that aids in maintaining safe distances from other vehicles and is connected to the Autonomous Braking System for use in emergencies.
 
360 around view cameras are fitted around the vehicle including both the side mirrors to display a picture of the vehicle and its surroundings on the multifunction display. This aids the driver in manoeuvring around objects and other vehicles safely.
 
Calibrations to the ADAS can be achieved only by an expert technician in a controlled environment using only approved procedures.

2. Rear of Car

The rear of the vehicle has many ADAS features, these features include:

 

Blind spot radars on either side of the bumper that use visual & audio alerts to let the driver know there is another vehicle where they can’t see it when they want to change lanes. This system is also used in the rear cross traffic alert system to stop the vehicle if another vehicle approaches from the side where the driver can’t see it.

 

Ultra-sonic parking sensors that can simply alert the driver to objects getting too close to the vehicle or used by advanced parking systems to help the vehicle self-park by using high frequency sound waves to sense approaching people, cars or other objects in close proximity. Calibration may only be required for the more advanced self-parking systems, but they still need to be in perfect working order to maintain their accuracy.

Conclusion

If you have a vehicle fitted with one or all of these advanced driver assist systems, it is important to maintain & repair them to factory specifications at all times to ensure not only your safety but everyone around you.